Airline fruit delivers bonanza for MAF

Published in the National Business Review 05 May 2006

International airlines serving whole items of fresh fruit to their first and business class passengers are generating a steady stream of cash for MAF as passengers take the fruit with them and cop an instant fine at the border.

Actress Hillary Swank is the most notable celebrity to be nabbed, but over 8 500 passengers paid a $200 instant fine at New Zealand airports last year, and there's been over two thousand cases to the end of April this year.

Gridlocked in growing Gisborne

Published in the National Business Review 05 May 2006

You aren't exactly easy to find, I said to Jacque, the cheery receptionist at the Portside Hotel in Gisborne. The Portside is a new hotel, described as an all suite hotel, which means that it does not have a restaurant or a bar.

Yes, she bubbled, we are, aren't we, as if this made the hotel somehow more exclusive and desirable. I just found it annoying.

Gridlocked in growing Gisborne

Published in the National Business Review 05 May 2006

You aren't exactly easy to find, I said to Jacque, the cheery receptionist at the Portside Hotel in Gisborne. The Portside is a new hotel, described as an all suite hotel, which means that it does not have a restaurant or a bar.

Yes, she bubbled, we are, aren't we, as if this made the hotel somehow more exclusive and desirable. I just found it annoying.

Coughing up to marry QANTAS

Published in the National Business Review 05 May 2006

It is a sign of Air New Zealand's desperation that its plan to redeem convertible notes held by QANTAS at face value would deliver QANTAS a considerable premium over the notes' market value.

How to get action on climate change: it's not easy

The world is getting warmer, and the scientists are wringing their hands about getting politicians to take the matter seriously, let alone do anything about it. Kyoto is in its death throes, and there is noting to replace it - yet. Tony Blair wants an agreed global framework, but New Zealand has abandoned a carbon tax.

What went wrong at ACT

Published in the National Business Review of 24 March 2006

Members of the ACT party meet in Wellington this weekend to regroup after an election which reduced the party's representation in Parliament from eight MPs to just two.

In the first of two articles John Bishop identifies defining moments for ACT says some persistent weakness in strategy, policy and organisation were never overcome.

MP seeks more fearless journalism

Published in the National Business Review of 17 March 2006

National's shadow Attorney General Chris Finlayson has urged New Zealand media to be more courageous in defending the freedom of the press, saying that journalists should not be intimated by extremism or official attempts to silence them.

This included the freedom to poke fun and to offend, the former lawyer told a National Press Club lunch in Wellington.

New mall ends Upper Hutt stalemate

Published in the National Business Review of 27 January 2006
Upper Hutt's new shopping mall - Trentham City Shopping Centre - is to open shortly in an effort to revitalize the city centre after years of uncertainty for retailers and shoppers.

At 13 732 sqm it is considerably smaller than a previously proposed and later abandoned ProMall development (later called Valley Plaza). A battle over the ProMall proposal hurt the development of the city for many years.

Want a result - tell a story

Published in Human Resources December 2005

Who remembers the stories they were told as a child? They made a powerful impression on us and not just because our minds were impressionable as children.

Families often have their own stories that illustrate the character and memorable actions of particular family members. Attend any wedding, bar mitzvah or 21st to hear them. Ditto for staff farewells, retirements and similar business celebrations.

Crisis, what electricity crisis?

published in the National Business Review 2 December 2005

The Electricity Commissioner, Ron Hemmingway is downplaying suggestions from electricity generators that there will be a shortage of electricity next winter because of low lake levels.

He told a Wellington audience recently that the Commission's analysis showed the country would most likely manage to get through without shortages although wholesale prices might rise.